Imtech has been awarded a design and build contract for the high-tech climate technology aboard the new Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carriers that are being built for the British Royal Navy. Imtech has been awarded a design and build contract for the high-tech climate technology aboard the new Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carriers that are being built for the British Royal Navy.

The order represents a value of more than 118 million British pounds (about 130 million euro). The ships, which are 280 metres long, are the largest naval ships ever to be built in the UK.

René van der Bruggen, CEO of Imtech commented:  “Imtech was able to satisfy the Royal Navy’s strict requirements, both in terms of technology and references demonstrating our ability to equip ships of this size with high-tech climate technology. This order is a confirmation of our know-how and expertise in the field of naval technology. Moreover, it makes an important contribution to the long-term continuity of our marine business.”

Design & build

The two aircraft carriers are about 65,000 tons each, a size between the American ‘Nimitz class’ and the French ‘Charles de Gaulle class’. The high-tech design & build order is a direct order from Babcock Marine, a member of the Aircraft Carrier Alliance.

The order comprises a total solution for the technical design, engineering, equipment, supply, installation and set-up of all HVAC systems (Heating, Ventilation & Air Conditioning) on board both of the ships. The order was awarded to the German business unit Imtech Schiffbau-/Dockbautechnik.

A sizeable share of the activities will be performed in co-operation with the English business unit Imtech Marine UK, which recently has executed several other projects for the British Royal Navy. Both business units are part of the Imtech Marine Group, Imtech’s marine division. The ships are being built at five English shipyards with final assembly at Rosyth, Scotland. HMS Queen Elizabeth is scheduled to enter service by 2016 and HMS Prince of Wales will follow two years later.