The World, a one-of-a-kind residential community at sea, will visit Greenland, the largest and least densely populated island on earth, from September 1 – 18, 2010 for an incredible journey though one of the planet's most breathtaking destinations. More than two weeks will be devoted to Greenland's Ice Age glaciers, deep fjords, towering mountains and majestic wilderness. Traveling at The World's signature, leisurely pace, Residents and Guests will be afforded a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to explore Greenland's rich Nordic and Paleo-Eskimo history, abundant wildlife and stunning scenery. Considered to be the "birthplace of the icebergs," Greenland's offshore waters are teeming with whales, seals, birds and a variety of other Arctic wildlife.

Although The World has visited Greenland once before, this is the first expedition of its kind, offering 18 days of guided tours, informative lectures and excursions as well as plenty of time for personal shopping and sightseeing. Residents and Guests will be led by a hand-selected team of Arctic and marine experts, naturalists, and botanists.


Reykjavik, Iceland: The expedition begins in the world's most northerly capital. Reykjavik's natural beauty will serve as a prelude to The World's passage into Greenland.

East Greenland: After traversing the Denmark Strait, the ship will pass along the Eastern coast of Greenland, where passengers can observe the expedition's first icebergs. The World's fleet of nimble zodiacs will enable travelers to explore the wild tundra and its magnificent wildlife ashore.

Prins Christian Sund and The Fjords of Southern Greenland: After spending time on the ice-covered east coast, the vessel will visit the lush, green, west coast via the Prins Christian Sund – a glacially carved fjord system over 50 miles long. This narrow channel is surrounded by mountains towering over 6,600 feet on either side.

Hvalsey and Qaqortoq: Home to Greenland's largest and best-preserved ruin, Hvalsey Church, the area is offers a glimpse into how the Norse settlers lived. A visit to the friendly and colorful town of Qaqortoq includes a guided walking tour and longer hikes into the surrounding countryside.

Brattahlid and Qooroq Fjord: Site of Erik the Red's estate, which today is a sheep farming community. You'll walk among the green pastures where Erik and his descendants lived until late in the 15th century. It is believed that this is where the first church of the New World once stood.

Ilulissat, Disko Bay: Meaning 'The Icebergs," Ilulissat is the most productive glacier in the northern hemisphere and its icefjord is designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The town was founded in 1741 and was later home to Arctic explorer Knud Rasmussen whose house is now a museum.

Uummannaq Fjord: Nearly 400 miles beyond the Arctic Circle, this will be the furthest north of the voyage. We'll head to the ancient winter settlement of Qilakitsoq, site of a group of mummified bodies, preserved for 500 years by the cold, dry conditions.

Disko Island and Southern Disko Bay: Greenland's largest and newest island is only 50 million years old with volcanic origins that make it geologically different from the rest of the country. The "land of a thousand islands" is home to a wealth of avian and marine life.

Nuuk and Godthabsfjord: Nuuk is Greenland's small but bustling capital city. Its National Museum contains exhibits that cover four and a half centuries of Greenlandic culture (including the Qilakitsoq mummies).

St. Anthony, Newfoundland: The expedition ends in the largest town in this region of northern Labrador. Travelers may choose to disembark or stay onboard as The World makes her way to Quebec and beyond.

Rates for the exclusive trip are available upon request. For more information on The World and a complete 2010 itinerary, please visit

***Please note that highlights mentioned above are for guidance only and are subject to change. Landing locations and activities may be altered depending on weather, sea and ice conditions.