Norwegian to Reduce Single-Use Plastic Consumption

The Norwegian Bliss

Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings announced today it would start eliminating single-use plastic straws across its fleet of 26 ships and two island destinations, Great Stirrup Cay and Harvest Caye.

The company said it anticipates that it will eliminate over 50 million plastic straws each year across its fleet with these changes.

As a member of Ocean Conservancy’s Trash Free Seas Alliance, the company is actively working towards solutions that will mitigate plastic waste entering the ocean, Norwegian said, in a statement.

“Eliminating single-use plastic straws across our global fleet and island destinations builds on our global environmental program ‘Sail & Sustain’ and further reduces our environmental footprint," said Frank Del Rio, president and chief executive officer of Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd.  “As a member of the Trash Free Seas Alliance, we are committed to doing our part to protect the world’s oceans for future generations to enjoy.”

“We commend Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings for this important step to reduce single-use plastics,” said Janis Searles Jones, chief executive officer of Ocean Conservancy. “Plastic straws are just a fraction of the plastic in the ocean, but they are always among the top ten items collected during Ocean Conservancy’s annual International Coastal Cleanup and can be deadly to ocean wildlife, which is why we have long urged our supporters to skip the straw when they can.”

Founded in 2012, the Trash Free Seas Alliance brings together thought leaders from industry, conservation and academia to create a forum for pragmatic, real-world collaboration focused on the measurable reduction of ocean trash.

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