New Quay

The cruise industry’s latest trend in slow cruising around Iceland is paying big dividends to Siglufjordur, which will welcome 35 calls in 2017, up from just six calls in 2015.

“Most of the ships visiting are the expedition ships, who vary in size from 500 to 11,000 tons,” said Anita Elefsen, director at The Herring Era Museum, which manages the cruise business in Iceland’s northernmost town – which was a tiny shark fishing village in 1900.

A new berth is available to cruise lines this year after a two year reconstruction process. The berth was lengthened to accommodate ships up to 220 meters in length and is located in the heart of town.

“This opens up many opportunities for us here in Siglufjordur and makes us able to welcome larger ships to berth, than before,” Elefsen told Cruise Industry News.

Callers include Iceland Pro Cruises, Silversea, Hurtigruten, Variety Cruises, Quark Expeditions, Phoenix Reisen, Ponant and Seaborun. Don’t forget Lindblad either, Elefsen added, who was the first to send a cruise ship to Siglufjordur.

“We try our best to be flexible and meet every ship’s demands. So far we have had no winter calls, but a few overnights that have worked out well,” Elefsen noted.