Carnival staff tours cruise terminal construction at Port Everglades.Members of Carnival Cruise Lines’ shore and operations staffs took a hardhat tour of the advancing construction work at Port Everglades of four cruise terminals that are part of a $54 million renovation project to entirely transform existing facilities into completely modern, guest-friendly cruise terminals.  The walk-through provided an on-the-ground advance opportunity to become familiar with the new passenger and baggage flows upon reopening the cruise terminals.

Port Everglades Cruise Terminals 2, 19, 21 and 26 are being renovated to serve more than 30 different Carnival Corporation cruise ships that will call at Port Everglades this year, as well as cruise ships from other lines. Construction is well underway and expected to be complete by the start of Port Everglades’ busy cruise season in mid-November.

Cruise lines operating ships of various sizes and capacities will be able to simultaneously process embarking and debarking passengers in each of the terminals. To accomplish this, three of the four terminals have been increased significantly in size, and the fourth terminal has been reconfigured.  All terminals will have two passenger loading bridges, separate and larger baggage halls, improved ground transportation areas, and new Florida-inspired artwork. Broward County's Public Works Department, Seaport Engineering & Construction Division is overseeing the renovations. Moss & Associates is the general contractor, and Bermello Ajamil & Partners, Inc. is the terminal architect and project construction administrator.
 
“At Carnival Cruise Lines, we constantly strive to enhance the guest experience,” said Milly Martin, Carnival’s senior director of guest logistics. “The opening of these new terminals is a great example of our continued partnership with Port Everglades.”

Construction work for the cruise terminal has created an estimated 1,000 construction jobs, equating to $40.7 million in personal income and $3.7 million in state and local taxes, according to an economic impact study by nationally recognized maritime research firm Martin Associates.