Furthering Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd.'s commitment to reducing their greenhouse gas footprint by one-third per available passenger cruise day by 2015, the global cruise line today announced that it is partnering with Ecospec to install a pilot test of their CSNOx system on Royal Caribbean International's Independence of the Seas.

The CSNOx system was introduced by Ecospec in January 2009, and is the world's first abatement technology reported to remove sulfur dioxide (SOx), oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and carbon dioxide (CO2) from engine emissions in one process. Royal Caribbean is the first cruise operator to initiate a feasibility study with Ecospec to explore the potential for installation of CSNOx systems on a cruise ship.

"Every day, we are actively researching methodologies and technologies that will reduce our emissions of not only SOx and NOx, but also CO2 as part of our comprehensive strategy to reduce our environmental impact," said Jamie Sweeting, global chief environmental officer and vice president of environmental stewardship for Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. "Our guiding principle of Above and Beyond Compliance, which is ingrained in our operating philosophy, challenges us to rise above what is required by law. We are optimistic that the CSNOx system will help us to meet our goal."

Previously, the CSNOx technology was installed and tested on White Sea, a Tanker Pacific vessel in 2009. The results of this test, published by Ecospec in February 2010, revealed an impressive 99 percent reduction of SOx, 66 percent reduction of NOx, and a 77 percent reduction of CO2. Additionally, wash water test results also surpassed the International Maritime Organization's exhaust gas cleaning discharge criteria. The Royal Caribbean pilot test is expected to be complete by the spring of 2011.