Arthur Rodney, President of Crystal Cruises (reported in CIN 6/16/88), has announced that the line's ship will "surpass all other cruise ship lines with unequalled service, revolutionary passenger stateroom features and a commitment to first class luxury."

The 49,000-ton 960-pax ship is being built in Japan by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries at a cost of more than $200 million and will be delivered in 1990.

The yet unnamed ship will feature luxury suites at nearly 800 sq.ft. and private verandahs in over 40 percent of the staterooms. Cabin amenities will include spacious sitting areas, walk-in closets, mini refrigerators and bars, interactive television systems, video cassette recorders and satellite direct-dial telephones.

The name Crystal Cruises was arrived at by the design firm of Landor Associates of San Francisco. According to a spokesperson for the cruise line, crystal connotates the best, the ultimate.

The ship will appeal to experienced cruisers and be comparable to the Royal Princess, according to the spokesperson. Per diems will be competitive with Royal Viking Line.

Rodney was formerly President of Princess Cruises. Joining him at Crystal are Doug Duncan, Vice President of Sales, and Greg Michael, Vice President of Finance, both formerly with Princess; Erling Frydenberg, Vice President of Hotel Operations, and Captain Ingar Engen, both formerly with Royal Viking Line.

Officers will be Norwegian and Japanese; the crew will be international and the dining room will be staffed and supervised by a European staff.

Service will begin in Spring of 1988 with itineraries in Alaska, the Caribbean and the Mexican Riviera via the Panama Canal, the South Pacific and the Orient.

Rogers & Cowan has been hired as the line's public relations agency. Selection of an advertising agency is expected to be completed during August.

By early October, the line expects to have a brochure and video as well as an ad campaign underway.

Crystal Cruises is wholly owned by Nippon Yusen Kaisha, the largest shipping company in Japan, which holds options on two more similar vessels.