Norwegian Cruise Line (NCL) has reported net income of $13.5 million, or $0.06 per share, on revenues of $239.7 million for the third quarter ended Sept. 30, 1998, compared to net income of $8.0 million, or $0.05 per share, on revenues of $172.6 million for the third quarter of 1997.

The revenue increase was attributed to the addition of the Norwegian Majesty in September 1997, the Marco Polo in July 1998 (through the acquisition of Orient Lines), the increased capacity of the Norwegian Wind and Norwegian Dream, and charter income from the Aida.

NCL also reported 1,047,407 passenger cruise days and a load factor of 99.9 percent for the third quarter of this year, compared to 848,522 passenger cruise days and a load factor of 104.3 percent for the same period last year.

The reduced load factor this year was due to lower occupancies on the Norwegian Star and on some of the Norwav's and the Norwegian Dream's European sailings, according to NCL.

For 1999, NCL has changed the European itinerary of the Norway, and the Norwegian Sea is replacing the Norwegian Star out of Houston in December. NCL has also extended the charter of the Aida to Arkona Touristik through April 2001.

Nine Months

For the nine-month period ended Sept. 30 1998, NCL posted net income of $9.5 million, or $0.03 per share, on revenues of $575.4 million, compared to net income of $8.2 million, or $0.05 per share, on revenues of $486.3 million for the first nine months of 1997.

NCL also reported 2,640,643 passenger cruise days and a load factor of 98.2 percent for the first nine months of 1998, compared to 2,461,903 passenger cruise days and a load factor of 104.6 percent for the same period last year.

NCL will stretch the Norwegian Majesty this winter and take delivery of the Norwegian Sky next summer, and plans to have its stock listed in the United States. But it has postponed its program of four additional newbuildings.