Mexico's newest port -in Madero, Chiapas on its southernmost Pacific coast - will be ready to accept cruise ships in November, Roger Grajales, secretary of tourism for Chiapas, told Cruise Industry News.

Two berths have already been completed, and the third and final berth will be finished in early November. The total length of all three berths will be 1,800 feet, with a water depth of 36 feet and a 1,485-ft. turning basin. Ship services include provisions, fresh water supply, and sewage and garbage collection.

Plans also call for a 35-acre cruise center, a 6,643- square foot terminal building, food and beverage vendors, arts and crafts stores, jewelry shops, travel agencies, an exotic birds area, parking lots and a lake.

This is the first attempt to implement a cruise terminal in Chiapas, which is known primarily for its cargo and commercial fishing ports, Grajales said.

While no ships seem to have committed to calls yet, Grajales said he is interested in ships sailing roundtrip from the West Coast of the U.S. to Panama, and Caribbean and Alaska repositioning voyages.

Grajales' short-term goal is what he called a modest 60 calls this year, but once the port is positioned more in the minds of U.S. cruise travelers, he expects much more. "We are working hard to position Chiapas as a relevant tourist destination in the U.S. market," he explained.